When Bali beaches go bad!

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Bali 1

If you’re like many Aussies, you’ve dreamt of spending warm summer nights on a Bali beach. You might want to rethink those visions of bliss and paradise because today’s beaches in Bali are rubbish – literally!

Michael and Larissa Milne, bloggers of Changes In Longitude were in for a rude awakening when they touched down in the Indonesian isle.  Check out their story.

On our first day in Bali we headed for the famed Kuta Beach. The current Lonely Planet guide offers a list of “Top 25 Experiences” in Bali, with Kuta Beach right on it.  According to their experts, “Tourism on Bali began here and is there any question why? . . .Kuta Beach was and always will be Bali’s best beach.” At least that’s the Lonely Planet version.

If our experience today is anything to go by, we can pitch our Lonely Planet guide in the trash. Or perhaps just pitch it on Kuta Beach. Because when we got there all we saw was trash, lots and lots of trash, on the sand, in the water and even clinging to the stray ankle. Plastic bags, bottles, cans, papers and heaven knows what else. It was downright filthy. We have never seen a beach this dirty, anywhere.

We knew that Kuta was one of the more built-up areas of Bali. We were expecting crowds, but what we saw was not the detritus of a few too many holiday merry-makers. This was a public sanitation disaster.

It’s not surprising the beach was practically devoid of people though there were a few intrepid souls sizzling away on the sand. They were lobster-red and had the look of folks who had come to Bali to go to the beach, and were damn well going to, regardless of the rubbish.  One sad-looking girl sat at the water’s edge amidst sodden debris, a lonely mermaid washed ashore from the sea of litter.

Trash walking on Kuta Beach

Trash walking on Kuta Beach

Surely this couldn’t be the normal state of affairs. Perhaps a garbage scow had recently overturned. Maybe the beach patrol was on strike. Bali has a reputation for being one of the most beautiful places on earth—there must be some explanation.

Unfortunately the explanation is not a good one. We learned that this is an annual event at Kuta Beach. According to the Jakarta Post, “Beached garbage is an annual problem for Kuta. From early December to late March, strong wind and powerful currents send waves of garbage from the ocean onto the beach.” Locals even refer to it as the “trash season” and say the debris comes from the nearby island of Java.

But we’re not so sure we accept the “Let’s blame Java approach.” You see, the sides of the roads in this part of Bali are convenient open-air trash receptacles piled high with the same stuff we saw on the beach. In the rainy season (which we were well into) storms wash the trash into gutters, out to sea and then back onto the beach where they wait to be washed out to sea again. It’s not quite the recycling system that Bali needs.

We left the beach via the grounds of the nearby Patra Resort.  Almost immediately we were amidst manicured lawns, trickling fountains and a sparkling pool.  We glanced back at the beach where we saw lounge chairs nestled on gently raked sand, with nary a speck out of place.

This is a view of the exact same beach taken from the shore side. (These chairs are visible in the photo of the woman on the beach at the top of this post.) From here the trash is hidden from view

This is a view of the exact same beach taken from the shore side. (These chairs are visible in the photo of the woman on the beach at the top of this post.) From here the trash is hidden from view

Because of the slope of the shore, the garbage wasn’t visible from here.  But we wondered how many of the hotel’s guests actually venture down to the waterline.  We saw one family do so. In a few seconds they came scurrying back like sand crabs escaping the tide. We bet they won’t go back for a second look.

Overall we loved the Balinese and much of the island was beautiful. But visitors should be aware of the situation on this and other beaches throughout the island. You really need to do your homework before visiting a place. With Bali, we thought we had.

Share with us your travel-related horror stories below.

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Tracee Tuesday

Tracee Tuesday is a travel writer, radio and television personality.Her mission is to inspire, inform and equip you with information necessary to experience the most amazing trips that are fun, affordable and culturally broadening.In her pastime, Tracee enjoys: white water rafting, astrobiology, zoology, traveling, music, horseback riding, and is an all-out foodie.