Incredible Photographs of WWII Planes Scattered on the Ocean Floor for Over 70 Years

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A US Coastguard captain has discovered and photographed over 150 lost WWII aircrafts at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean.

Incredible photographs of over 150 lost WWII aircrafts scattered on the ocean floor, taken by Brandi Mueller

Incredible photographs of over 150 lost WWII aircrafts scattered on the ocean floor, taken by Brandi Mueller

The discovery was made 8 kilometres from Roi-Namur Island, part of the Marshall Islands. The planes include several historic American wartime aircrafts, such as the TBF and TBM Avengers, Douglas SBD Dauntless dive bombers and the F4U Corsair.

These stunning images show these planes surrounded by coral and fish as they litter the ocean floor, more than seven decades after they were originally put there.

A F4U Corsair which landed on its propeller and has remained upright for over 70 years

A F4U Corsair which landed on its propeller and has remained upright for over 70 years

Brandi Mueller, who is taking time off as a Coastguard captain to teach scuba diving in tropical islands, took the breathtaking pictures while exploring the site.

“After World War II the USA decided it would cost more fuel to transport the planes home by ship than it would to replace them, so they were essentially dumped like trash in the ocean,” Brandi said.

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“The planes were pretty much just pushed off the back of a ship, so some are laying upside down and on their sides.”

“Others are sitting perfectly in the sand as if the pilot could just show up, get in his plane, and fly it off the bottom of the ocean.”

Her pictures also show other Allied aircraft including B-25 Mitchell, Helldivers, Curtiss C-46 Commando and F4F Wildcats.

The planes were likely dumped into the ocean off of transport ships and aircraft carriers after the successful Pacific Campaign and U.S. victory in 1945. Now, the submerged US military aircrafts are just a physical reminder of the Marshall Islands’ wartime history.

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Wreckage of lost WWII aircrafts now homes to fish and other ocean dwellers

Wreckage of lost WWII aircrafts now home to coral and fish on the ocean floor

“I love descending on the aeroplanes,” said Brandi. “As an avid scuba diver I’m always excited to dive but seeing aeroplanes underwater just evokes very unique feelings.

“You expect sunken ships, but not aeroplanes, they just aren’t supposed to be there. And they seem to be resting so peacefully.”

About Author

Lisa Nikolau

Lisa Nikolau is a freelance writer who has been specializing in travel, culture and current events since 2012. She currently writes on travel and news related topics for YouTravel.com.au.She has traveled to Peru, throughout west and eastern Europe, and has lived in southern Spain.At the moment, Lisa’s favorite pastimes are learning foreign languages, exploring hiking trails in the Olympic National Forest, and ending the day with friends at one of Seattle’s many microbreweries.